Category Archives: Wind

Tide and Current Taxi expedition

On Saturday, May 18, at dawn, SP Weather Station partnered with Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi on a water-borne dérive in Jamaica Bay. We brought along maps of flight paths and Atlantic coast bird migration routes and, very loosely, let them guide our journey.

Marie’s blog entry gives a pretty great overview of the day.

NASA GOES captures Hurricane Sandy

Amazing images of Hurricane Sandy courtesy of NASA GOES satellites:

Video from NASA GOES online here.

You can also buy a print of a NASA GOES image from 20×200 with net revenue to benefit the American Red Cross – just one of many ways to help out the recovery efforts, of course.

Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles

If you’re in San Francisco, check out SPWS weather interpreter Tim Dye’s new project ‘Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles’, on Saturday, October 20 as part of a tech-art event in San Francisco at the Urban Prototyping exhibition.
‘Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles’ will use AirCasting to crowd source air quality measurements collected by citizens.  Attendees will have a chance to check out an AirCasting Air Monitor, LED Vest, and Android phone and troll the streets of downtown SF sensing tiny particles.

Read more about the project and event here http://sf.urbanprototyping.org/projects/street-sensing-seeing-tiny-particles/.

Details:
-Free and open to the public
-Saturday, October 20
-Time:  noon to 10 PM
-Location:  SOMA between 5th and 6th
-Schedule and line-up:  http://sf.urbanprototyping.org/exposition/lineup/

Hurricane Isaac

From Rebecca J. Rosen for The Atlantic:

This comes from hint.fm, a collaboration of data-visualization stars Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg. Their wind map provides a nearly real-time glimpse of the wind flow around the United States, based on hourly data drawn from the National Digital Forecast Database. “So,” they write, “what you’re seeing is a living portrait.” (It looks even better on their site, so definitely click through to see it in its full glory.)

The map is always beautiful, even without a hurricane’s massive force. Today, though, it can give you a sense of just how far-reaching are Isaac’s effects, just how much of the country can feel the winds, literally, of a storm in the gulf.

For contrast, on the Wind Map’s gallery page you can see some different wind patterns from earlier this year

Wind Map

Visualization experts Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg impress again with their Wind Map project.