Category Archives: Local Environment

We couldn’t have put it better than this

From Blonde Art Books (check their excellent photos too):

Our first event on the Blonde Art Books tour was a huge success last night at Furthermore in Washington, DC. Blonde Art Books led a series of presentations of various local independent publishing projects. Larissa Leclair of the Indie Photobook Library shared over 30 photobooks from the library that have been donated by local artists. Natalie Campbell introduced her collaborative project SP Weather Station  (with Heidi Neilson) as well as France-based Cahiers Intempestifs, and Lauren VHS presented her on-going project Cancelled as well as her upcoming publication Non-participation. Local book-makers participated in an informal show&tell including Ginevra Shay, Renee Regan, Ryan Syrell, Kyle Tata, Bill Crandall, Martine Workman, and Bryan Minnich, among others.

Special thanks to Sonel Breslav from Blonde Art Books for instigating last night’s event and to Furthermore for hosting! We were pleased to be included among so many other great projects and to present the first opportunity for the public to view the 2012 SP Weather Reports (which can now be viewed online here). We want to join Sonel in thanking the artists/publishers who came out and share their work.

Table with the 2012 SP Weather Reports and Cahiers Intempestifs

Tide and Current Taxi expedition

On Saturday, May 18, at dawn, SP Weather Station partnered with Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi on a water-borne dérive in Jamaica Bay. We brought along maps of flight paths and Atlantic coast bird migration routes and, very loosely, let them guide our journey.

Marie’s blog entry gives a pretty great overview of the day.

Ellie Irons in “Drawn to Nature,” Wave Hill

2013 SPWS Weather Interpreter Ellie Irons will present a range of pieces from her Invasive Pigments project, opening tomorrow. Ellie will conduct a workshop this Saturday April 6th from 12–2pm; the exhibition reception is on Sunday, April 7th from 2–4:30pm. Full details/link below!

Drawn to Nature
Wave Hill, Glyndor Gallery
April 2 – June 16, 2013

Directions & shuttle info here

12/29: A Perfect Snow in NYC

By Andy Newman for The New York Times:

The ideal city snowstorm, meteorological Platonists say, blankets the landscape without burying it, beautifies but does not burden, transforms and cocoons without paralyzing or even particularly inconveniencing.

Such an event is expected to come our way on Saturday.

Flakes should begin falling around 11 a.m., as a low pressure system passes south and east of the metropolitan area, giving children plenty of time to finish a hearty breakfast.

The temperature will hover in the mid-30s – just cold enough for the snow to safely stick, but no colder. The breeze will be sufficient to make cheeks rosy, but will not slash at the skin or penetrate down the necks of parkas.

For the better part of the day, the snow will continue – gently, never blinding. By the time it ceases for good shortly before midnight, two to four inches will have fallen – just enough, perhaps, to permit sledding.

“Definitely snowfall that can be plowed,” said Dan Hoffman, a National Weather Service meteorologist, “but definitely not crippling by any means.”

At least that’s what they’re forecasting. Who knows what will really happen.

Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles

If you’re in San Francisco, check out SPWS weather interpreter Tim Dye’s new project ‘Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles’, on Saturday, October 20 as part of a tech-art event in San Francisco at the Urban Prototyping exhibition.
‘Street Sensing: seeing tiny particles’ will use AirCasting to crowd source air quality measurements collected by citizens.  Attendees will have a chance to check out an AirCasting Air Monitor, LED Vest, and Android phone and troll the streets of downtown SF sensing tiny particles.

Read more about the project and event here http://sf.urbanprototyping.org/projects/street-sensing-seeing-tiny-particles/.

Details:
-Free and open to the public
-Saturday, October 20
-Time:  noon to 10 PM
-Location:  SOMA between 5th and 6th
-Schedule and line-up:  http://sf.urbanprototyping.org/exposition/lineup/

Images of September 8th NYC tornadoes

From The New York Times:

Radar images / commentary from the US National Weather Service here.

Newtown Creek wrapup

Thanks to Eric Sanderson of The Welikia Project and Kate Zidar from the Newtown Creek Alliance for illuminating discussion of the Newtown Creek’s unique landscape, history & post-industrial challenges — and for pointing out avenues for future engagement.  Also many thanks to Flux Factory for hosting the event, as part of their yearlong educational intiative: The Future of Your Neighborhood: Who Decides?

Thanks in particular to Christina Vassallo, Douglas Paulson and Lacey Tauber from Flux, and to all of the concerned citizens and neighbors who came out to the event.

Eric Sanderson with historic Newtown Creek map

Out Now: ‘The Weather Observer’s Handbook’

From the Cloud Appreciation Society:

We are very pleased to announce that ‘The Weather Observer’s Handbook’ by Stephen Burt is published today. The handbook provides a comprehensive, practical and independent guide to all aspects of making weather observations. It is ideal for both amateur observers looking for help in choosing their first weather instruments on a tight budget and for professional observers looking for a comprehensive and up-to-date guide.

The Cloud Appreciation Society gives info on the following discounts: You can buy it directly from Cambridge University Press at a 20% discount: In the UK, download the 20% discount flyer; in the US, vist www.cambridge.org/us/9781107026810 and enter the discount code: E2BURT.

7/26/12: Newtown Creek – Past, Present Future | Eric Sanderson and Kate Zidar

Thursday, July 26th 7-9PM
Flux Factory workshop in partnership with SP Weather Station

Newtown Creek: Past, Present, Future
with Eric Sanderson, Wildlife Conservation Society’s Welikia Project
and Kate Zidar, Newtown Creek Alliance 

Flux Factory: 39-31 29th Street, Long Island City
Free and open to the public

SPWS is pleased to partner with Flux Factory on the third workshop in Flux’s yearlong initiative, The Future of Your Neighborhood: Who Decides? This ongoing monthly series invites New Yorkers to effectively envision and enact their advocacy skills through open dialogue, and to unpack the assumptions that frame how we address neighborhood concerns.

The July workshop will focus on Newtown Creek: one of the most polluted industrial sites in America, bordering Flux Factory’s Long Island City neighborhood. Eric Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Welikia Project will share historical research he’s collected on the creek and surrounding watershed, with the aim of making information available to artists, designers, city planners, and other interested parties for widespread use in restoring its original splendor. Kate Zidar, Executive Director of Newtown Creek Alliance, will present information on the current state of the creek, including how community members can participate in materializing visions for its future.

The Future of Your Neighborhood: Who Decides? will continue into 2013 with workshops on urban agriculture, historic preservation, sustainable transportation, and other topics near and dear to New Yorkers. If you have an idea for a workshop, please email christina[at]fluxfactory[dot]org.

This educational initiative is organized by Christina Vassallo, Douglas Paulson and Lacey Tauber. It is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The Welikia Project’s work on Newtown Creek is supported by the NYCEF Newtown Creek Fund administered through the Hudson River Foundation.

Hurricane Irene from space, etc.

As Hurricane Irene (the size of California) moves up the east coast, and NYC prepares with its first-ever system wide MTA shutdown at noon today, SP Weather Station is removing its instruments temporarily from the rooftop of Flux Factory. Batten down the hatches, East Coast.

NYC evacuation zones:

http://project-s3.wnyc.org/news-maps/hurricane-zones/hurricane-zones.html